TEXTS

‘Pop in the Age of Boom. Richard Hamilton’s Just what is it that make today’s homes so different so appealing?’, first published in The Burlington Magazine, September 2007.

This article tells the story of Richard Hamilton’s collage of 1956, one of the first works of Pop art, and reveals the sources used in its creation.


— ‘The Bunk collages of Eduardo Paolozzi’, first published in The Burlington Magazine, April 2008.

This article is a complete account of the series of ‘Bunk’ collages made by Eduardo Paolozzi during the 1940s, including new research on the source material.


— ‘Oskar Schlemmer’s Bauhaustreppe, 1932: Part One’, first published in The Burlington Magazine, July 2009.

This is the first of a two-part article covering the creation and first display of Oskar Schlemmer’s famous 1932 painting ‘Bauhaustreppe’, now displayed in the Museum of Modern Art, New York.


A Natural History of Painting. The Art of Gerhard Richter. e-book 2009

This seventy-page fully illustrated monograph provides an account of Gerhard Richter’s career, from his early days as a student in East Germany, through his invention of a spectacular ‘photographic’ style of painting, taking in the many twists and turns his work took into the early years of the twenty-first century. A Natural History of Painting. The Art of Gerhard Richter is the e-book version of an unpublished monograph written in 2009.

‘Oskar Schlemmer’s Bauhaustreppe, 1932: Part two’. First published in The Burlington Magazine, September 2010

— ‘Used Future: the Early Sculptures of Eduardo Paolozzi’. First published in: Eduardo Paolozzi. Archaeology of a Used Future. Sculpture 1946-59. Exhibition Catalogue, Jonathan Clark Fine Art, 2011.


— ‘Henry Moore’s Knife Edge Mirror Two Piece at the National Gallery of Art in Washington’. First published in The Burlington Magazine, April 2011.


‘Cézanne and the Past’, first published in The Burlington Magazine, March 2013.


‘Paolozzi in America’, first published in The Burlington Magazine, September 2011.

‘THE IMAGE OF AMERICA radiates in the early collages of Eduardo Paolozzi, illuminating works such as those in the famous Bunk series with a ‘kind of dynamism that the English could never capture’, as Paolozzi later put it – implicitly invoking his own exotic origins as an Italian immigrant brought up in Edinburgh’. This article gives an account of Paolozzi’s work in America in the years around 1960, his exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery, and his eventual disillusionment with the ideals of American art and society.